Entertainment- Fox News Uses 'SpongeBob' Episode to Attack Poor People (Video)

Date : 31 Ekim  2013 Perşembe - 20:46, Category : ENTERTAINMENT


Entertainment- Fox News Uses 'SpongeBob' Episode to Attack Poor People (Video)



Entertainment- Fox News Uses 'SpongeBob' Episode to Attack Poor People (Video)

In an upcoming episode of the Nickelodeon cartoon 'SpongeBob SquarePants,' the lead character loses his cooking job at the Krusty Krab restaurant because his boss Mr.

In an upcoming episode of the Nickelodeon cartoon "SpongeBob SquarePants," the lead character loses his cooking job at the Krusty Krab restaurant because his boss Mr. Krabs discovers he can save five cents by letting the loveable sponge go.

According to MediaMatters.org, two conservative media outlets, both owned by News Corp., are using the episode to slam poor people who use social services.

However, there was no mention of corporate welfare, which the Wall Street Journal estimated at close to $200 billion a year.

First, the New York Post wrote:

Lest he sit around idly, mooching off the social services of Bikini Bottom, a depressed SpongeBob sets out to return to gainful employment wherever he can find it.

Fox & Friends' Heather Nauert then reported the story with her slam on the poor who use government assistance (video below).

"Instead of mooching off social services at Bikini Bottom, that's the town, SpongeBob sets out to return to the work force," said Nauert. "It kinda mirrors real life, right?"

Ironically, Fox News hated SpongeBob in August 2011 because of a book and video about man-made global warming, reported MediaMatters.org (video below).

"The Department of Education invited a bunch of D.C. kids in and they had this festivity and they handed out these particular Nickelodeon books where clearly Nickelodeon is pushing a global warming agenda," lamented co-host Steve Doocy.

Co-host Gretchen Carlson added, "The government agency showed kids this cartoon and handed out books that blamed man for global warming, but they did not tell kids that that is actually a disputed fact. Oops!"

Sources: MediaMatters.org, Wall Street Journal, New York Post




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